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Ho-Ho-Homicide

ebook

This "enjoyable" Maine-set mystery "skillfully uses misdirection to keep the reader guessing to the end" (Publishers Weekly).

Business is booming at the Scottish Emporium in Moosetookalook, Maine, and Liss MacCrimmon Ruskin couldn't be happier—or busier. A romantic getaway at a rustic Christmas tree farm is just what she needs. But the property's mysterious past has her feeling less than merry . . .

Liss is surprised when an old friend asks her to spend a week at the Christmas tree farm she just inherited. Realizing it's a perfect chance for her and her husband, Dan, to get away, Liss happily accepts and packs her bags for the tiny town of New Boston.

Upon their arrival, they're greeted by a ramshackle farmhouse and unfriendly townsfolk. It's hardly the idyllic vacation locale they hoped for, especially when needling neighbors raise questions about the farm's dark history. Who was the man whose body was found neatly netted in a shipment of Scotch pine? Why did the owner vanish into thin air? And why are the trees growing so close together, forming a maze more twisted than a Celtic knot?

The rumors pile up faster than snowdrifts in a blizzard, and something even more scandalous than murder hides beneath the town's humdrum façade. When a series of "accidents" strikes the farm, she'll have to spring into action faster than a Highland Fling to find the killer lurking among the pines—before she ends up in a pine box herself . . .

"An enjoyable small-town Christmas cozy." —Library Journal

"Fans of Carolyn Hart's Death on Demand series will enjoy this." —Booklist


Expand title description text
Publisher: Kensington Books

Kindle Book

  • Release date: June 26, 2014

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780758292865
  • File size: 353 KB
  • Release date: June 26, 2014

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9780758292865
  • File size: 474 KB
  • Release date: June 26, 2014

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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

This "enjoyable" Maine-set mystery "skillfully uses misdirection to keep the reader guessing to the end" (Publishers Weekly).

Business is booming at the Scottish Emporium in Moosetookalook, Maine, and Liss MacCrimmon Ruskin couldn't be happier—or busier. A romantic getaway at a rustic Christmas tree farm is just what she needs. But the property's mysterious past has her feeling less than merry . . .

Liss is surprised when an old friend asks her to spend a week at the Christmas tree farm she just inherited. Realizing it's a perfect chance for her and her husband, Dan, to get away, Liss happily accepts and packs her bags for the tiny town of New Boston.

Upon their arrival, they're greeted by a ramshackle farmhouse and unfriendly townsfolk. It's hardly the idyllic vacation locale they hoped for, especially when needling neighbors raise questions about the farm's dark history. Who was the man whose body was found neatly netted in a shipment of Scotch pine? Why did the owner vanish into thin air? And why are the trees growing so close together, forming a maze more twisted than a Celtic knot?

The rumors pile up faster than snowdrifts in a blizzard, and something even more scandalous than murder hides beneath the town's humdrum façade. When a series of "accidents" strikes the farm, she'll have to spring into action faster than a Highland Fling to find the killer lurking among the pines—before she ends up in a pine box herself . . .

"An enjoyable small-town Christmas cozy." —Library Journal

"Fans of Carolyn Hart's Death on Demand series will enjoy this." —Booklist


Expand title description text
Please visit the Official New Hampshire Downloadable Books BlogThis project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Funding for additional materials was made possible by a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities.